LIFE SERVICE: NASS to focus on constitution amendment and Socioeconomic challenges this week

David OputahFebruary 27, 20245 min

From constitution amendment bills to the inclusion of Anambra state as an oil-producing state, lawmakers are poised to have robust discussions and dissenting views.

In the bustling corridors of the National Assembly, this week promises to be a pivotal one as several crucial bills vie for attention. From constitutional amendment bills to the inclusion of Anambra state as an oil-producing state, lawmakers are poised to have robust discussions and dissenting views.

As the nation grapples with pressing socioeconomic challenges, lawmakers are also set to deliberate on legislative measures that could reshape the landscape of governance and address longstanding concerns.

In this Legislative Intelligence Forecast Entry (LIFE) we take a closer look at the major bills set to dominate discussions in the hallowed halls of the Assembly this week.

A Bill to Alter the Constitution for Judicial Reform

One of the pivotal bills slated for discussion is the Bill for an Act to Alter Paragraph 2 of Section 231 of the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, 199 (as amended) to Provide Timeframe for the appointment of Justice of the Supreme Court of Nigeria and for Related Matters.

The bill in its second reading proposes to amend the Constitution to establish a definitive timeframe for the appointment of Justices to the Supreme Court of Nigeria.

The aim is to streamline the appointment process, ensuring efficiency and timely justice delivery. The implications of such an amendment are significant, impacting the overall judicial system and its ability to uphold the rule of law.

The National Judicial Council will have lots to say about this bill.

Constitutional Amendment for Majority Voting in Presidential and Gubernatorial Elections

Another significant legislative endeavour is the proposed Bill for an Act to Alter the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, 1999 by changing the System of simple Majority of electing the President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria and State Governors where there are more than two candidates to ensure the winner scores more than half of the total votes cast and for Related Matters.

The bill, in its second reading, aims to replace the current system of simple majority with a requirement for the winning candidate to secure more than half of the total votes cast, especially in scenarios with more than two candidates.

This reform aims to bolster the legitimacy and representativeness of elected officials, fostering a more robust democratic process.

Advocates argue that this change will enhance the legitimacy of elected leaders and promote a more representative democracy. However, this has the potential for a re-run raising questions on costs.

Amendment of the Banks and Other Financial Institutions Act for Fee Disclosure

In the realm of financial regulation, legislators are set to deliberate on A Bill for an Act to Amend the Banks and Others Financial Institution Act, Cap. B3, Laws of the Federation of Nigeria, 2004 to mandate Banks and Other Financial Institutions in Nigeria to State in writing, all charges and fees accruing to any transaction in the Bank and for Related Matters.

The proposed changes mandate banks and financial institutions to explicitly state all fees associated with transactions.

This bill, in its second reading, seeks to enhance transparency and consumer protection within the financial sector, empowering consumers with clear information regarding transaction costs.

A Bill to Amend the Niger Delta Development Commission Act:

The National Assembly will scrutinize a Bill for an Act to Amend the Niger Delta Development Commission Act, Cap N86, Laws of the Federation of Nigeria, 2004 to Provide for the inclusion of Anambra State as an Oil Producing State and for Related Matters.

This proposed amendment underscores efforts to address regional disparities and promote equitable resource allocation, recognizing the evolving dynamics of Nigeria’s oil industry.

The question is, would it still be Niger Delta development with the inclusion of South-East states? Also, when was Anambra State recognised as an oil-producing state?

Expect some drama.

Socioeconomic Challenges and Labour Protests:

Amidst these legislative endeavours, Nigeria grapples with pressing socioeconomic challenges, prompting protests by labour unions.

Issues such as unemployment, inflation, and inadequate social services have fueled discontent among the populace, underscoring the urgency for comprehensive reforms and inclusive policies to address systemic inequalities and promote economic prosperity.

Lawmakers are urged to consider the broader impact of their decisions on the economic well-being of the nation.

As discussions unfold in the coming days, the fate of these bills and their potential to address the nation’s challenges will become clearer. The synergy between legislative action and public concerns will play a pivotal role in shaping the trajectory of Nigeria’s governance.

Stay tuned to OrderPaper for comprehensive coverage and analysis of Nigeria’s legislative landscape.

David Oputah

Oputah David M is a Bloomberg-trained Journalist with a diversified experience in online journalism and newsroom management. He is a 2023 MTN Media Innovation fellow!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Please email us - contents@orderpaper.ng - if you need this content for legitimate research purposes. Please check our privacy policy

  • JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

  • JOIN OUR COMMUNITY
    Close